10 plants that bloom indoors

10 plants that bloom indoors




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Photo: Alexandra Gorn/Unsplash / Casa.com

Flowering plants have the power to add color to any interior space, working as part of the decor, and they also bring a variety of mental and emotional health benefits. After all, plants have been shown to reduce stress, increase life satisfaction, increase creativity, and even boost self-esteem.



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Photo: Max Williams/Unsplash/Casa.com

If you think you need any or all of these things at home, then this list with 10 plants that bloom inside the house is perfect! See species and how to care for each one:

1. Flower of fortune (Kalanchoe Blossfeldiana)

Kalanchoe plants are long-flowering perennial succulents native to Madagascar, where they thrive in arid environments. The flowers come in a variety of colors, including red, pink, yellow and white, with the plant producing new flowers almost year-round in response to sunlight.



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Plant care tips

  • Light: Preferably in full sun; can tolerate partial shade.
  • Water: Complete and intermittent irrigation.
  • Soil: Well-drained, acidic, light and sandy.
  • Pet Safety: Toxic to dogs and cats.

2. African Violet (Saintpaulia ionantha)

One of the most popular plants to have at home, african violets They do very well indoors. They are native to Tanzania and have delicate, downy leaves. While violets are known to have vibrant purple flowers year round, there are also varieties with pink, red, blue and white flowers. As root rot is a common problem, selecting a well-draining pot is essential for these plants.



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Plant care tips

  • Light: Bright indirect sunlight is ideal; moderate light is adequate.
  • Water: Moist, but never soggy. Water when the soil appears dry at the top but damp at the bottom.
  • Soil: Well draining, slightly acidic. Add sand or other porous materials to the potting soil.
  • Pet Safety: Non-toxic to dogs and cats.

3. Sicilian Lemon (citrus lemon)

Most citrus trees are grown outdoors, but lemon trees produce fragrant, delicate flowers before fruiting and can be grown indoors under the right conditions.

Trees need airflow and moisture, therefore, make sure that there is good air circulation in your home. You will also want a misting device to spray your plant. In addition, lemon trees need plenty of sun and water, as well as regular fertilization.



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Plant care tips

  • Light: Ample direct sunlight (minimum 8 hours).
  • Water: Water abundantly and often.
  • Soil: Well drained.
  • Pet Safety: Toxic to dogs and cats.

4. Jasmine (jasminum polyanthum or jasminum sambac)

Gardeners love jasmine because of its sweet fragrance and winter flowers. The plant normally sets in the fall and produces flowers in August, so it is recommended to leave it outside during this time to ensure the jasmine is exposed to low temperatures before returning it to a location near a plant. window indoors.



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Photo: Habib M’Henni/Wikimedia Commons/TreeHugger / Casa.com

Plant care tips

  • Light: Can tolerate four hours of direct sunlight a day.
  • Water: Keep the soil moist but not damp.
  • Soil: Porous; can add shell or other materials.
  • Pet Safety: Non-toxic to dogs and cats.

5. Peace Lily (Spathiphyllum wallisii)

Native to Central America, the peace lily is part of a genus of more than 40 species of tropical herbaceous perennials. Contrary to the name, these plants are not part of the lily family and are instead related to other popular houseplants, including the philodendron and Alokasia.

Reaching up to 90cm tall indoors, arrangements of these plants can create a stunning look!



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Plant care tips

  • Light: Medium, indirect light.
  • Water: Water when the top layer of soil dries out.
  • Soil: Well-drained; mixture of peat and sand.
  • Pet Safety: Toxic to dogs and cats.

6. Butterfly orchid (Phalaenopsis)

In tropical and subtropical Asia, where orchids are native, they grow on trees and thrive in soil with moss and bark. These flowering plants prefer warm, humid conditions and are commonly grown indoors around the world.



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Photo: Kristina Strasunske/TreeHugger / Casa.com

Plant care tips

  • Light: Requires indirect light and deep shade.
  • Water: Always water in the morning, let the soil dry out completely between waterings.
  • Soil: Use bark and/or moss.
  • Pet Safety: Non-toxic to dogs and cats.

7. Amaryllis (Hippeastrum petiolatum)

Native to Central and South America, amaryllis plants produce striking trumpet-shaped flowers that are often striped or mottled.

Grown from bulbs typically planted in late fall or early winter, amaryllis like containers that allow about 2 inches of space between the bulb and the rim when planted. Plenty of water and organic fertilizer, applied after a flower bud appears, encourage flowering.



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Plant care tips

  • Light: Bright and indirect.
  • Water: Abundant water at first planting, then sparingly until the appearance of flowers.
  • Soil: Clay and perlite mix with plenty of organic matter.
  • Pet Safety: Toxic to dogs and cats.

8. May Flower Cactus (Schlumbergera truncata)

Known for their flat stems and vibrant red flowers that usually bloom in May, hence the name. An easy-to-maintain plant, these cacti aren’t like the desert varieties; instead, they are native to the Brazilian rainforest and require more water.



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Photo: Lana2011/Getty Images/TreeHugger / Casa.com

Plant care tips

  • Light: Adaptable, but prefers diffused light that mimics rainforest conditions.
  • Water: Water abundantly and allow the soil to dry out between waterings.
  • Soil: Light, well drained.
  • Pet Safety: Non-toxic to dogs and cats.

9. Angel Wing Begonia (coccinea begonia)

Named for their foliage, said to be shaped like angel wings, angel wing begonias produce clusters of flowers in a variety of colors including red, white, orange or pink.

This plant does not like to be sprayed, and too much moisture can cause stains and mold on the leaves. A potassium-rich fertilizer, as well as removing any flowers as they wither and die, will encourage future flower production.



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Photo: Freelancer_ghostwriting/Getty Images/TreeHugger/Casa.com

Plant care tips

  • Light: Bright indirect light, no strong sun.
  • Water: Let the soil drain and the top dry before watering.
  • Soil: Well drained, rich in organic matter.
  • Pet Safety: Toxic to dogs and cats.

10. Pending Violet (Streptocarpus saxorum)

Also known as false African violet, pendant violets produce delicate, small flowers and have drooping foliage, which makes them ideal for hanging planters and tall pots. Native to Kenya and Tanzania, the small herbaceous plant does not tolerate heat and prefers temperatures between 20-30°C, making it an ideal houseplant.



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Photo: Liuyushan/Getty Images/TreeHugger/Casa.com

Plant care tips

  • Light: bright, indirect light; may tolerate shade, but may not bloom.
  • Water: Let the mixture dry slightly before watering.
  • Soil: Well-drained, clayey, pH neutral.
  • Pet Safety: Non-toxic to dogs and cats.

* Via TreeHugger

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